Archive for April, 2010

Of politics and General Elections

April 26, 2010

Really, I have no idea what might be more fascinating for us modern ‘Gen Y’ Singaporeans, blessed with a modern, wide-ranging, education that forcibly exposes us to the sundry things of the world, even as we are surely not worldly; the British General Election, or a GE in Singapore. More pertinently, perhaps, is what ought to be more fascinating.

On the one hand, we have an election in a once great global superpower, which still clings to some little influence in world affairs of peace, finance, and diplomacy. Yet, the nation’s best boast now is probably its cultural heritage and reach across time and geography. So, how much should we care about an election we can’t vote in, in a country going not-so-gently into the good night?

How much, in comparison to an election in the nation of your birth, which, small as it is, doubtless owns some special place in your heart? An election in which the results should, and could, affect your lifestyle and the way you live, in small, or perhaps, not-so-small ways? And, an election in which  (more-or-less forgone result aside) the process could have implications for the political health of the nation in which you live?

This article, nonetheless, ought to be of some relevance. It must, however, be conceded that the author does seem to be complaining and voicing what he (wrongly?) believes to be public sentiment with possibly insufficient data. Some of the arguments and conclusions might be iffy, but certainly, on the issue of the point of an election, I’d say he is quite accurate.

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Poetry

April 14, 2010

The only problem
with haiku is that you just
get started and then

— Roger McGough

Singapore I Am Disappoint

April 7, 2010

I’m not going to pretend I know anything about this game, but considering that one of the more prominent local bloggers (Mr. Brown) decided to write about it, I’d say it deserves some mention here for the MONUMENTAL FAIL.

For those who can make neither head nor tail of it, it is a US game with, inexplicably enough, some voice acting that seems to have come straight out of a HDB heartland, with the stresses in all the wrong places. For a more expert critique, try asking an English Language student.

But, in all seriousness, this response is hardly born of a colonial hangover or a prejudiced opinion about how English has to be spoken in an ang moh or atas manner. Firstly, why would the game developers permit horrible voice acting to mangle English and render harder to understand a game aimed primarily at American audiences?

Secondly, and more importantly, do note that the English really is terrible. A few lahs and lors away from being, as the Gahmen might put, not Speaking Good English.